Counselling: Brene Brown Style



What Can You Learn From Counselling Experts?



How many times did you discuss about therapy/counselling and the name ‘Brene Brown’ pops up? As in any field, there are those who stand out more than others. Their personalities, expertise and way of communicating really helps to connect with the wider audience. Motivation is needed during therapy so that clients can be prompted to progress, nobody wants to be stuck in the past or stay constricted with their problems. Amongst the many therapy modalities, what I see is that lots of therapists forget about delivering compassion during sessions and other times compassion can be a fruitless pursuit that chases clients away from the office. Why does this matter?  If you can incorporate these following techniques in to your life, I can pretty much bet you will see positive changes over time. 



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Building the right connection goes a long way


Brene Brown has done much research on empathy and one of the core principles of Rogerian therapy focuses on creating an empathic bridge between client and therapist and to acknowledge that the role of the therapist is to understand the client’s difficulties and reflect your knowledge and understanding in a compassionate manner. Using the right therapeutic treatments also forms part of the empathy process. If you get it wrong, it can create a rupture in the therapeutic relationship so getting this part right is crucial. Part of Brown’s idea of connection is to create an empathic bond where ideas and values are shared and respected between both parties so that mutual communication is established, this essentially makes it more likely that the client will become open and trustworthy with the therapist; after all, what is the point of therapy if the client doesn’t trust the therapist and at the back of their mind they are doubting whether the sessions are even helping? One of the best ways I build a connection with my clients is to ensure everything discussed is confidential and that there is no judgement in therapy. I become aware of my tone and ensure it mimics that of the client, though there are exceptions; if a client is timid and has a passive voice, my job is to develop confidence within the client so I will adopt a more assertive voice but one that is friendly and approachable rather than offensive and intimidating. 


One of the other issues I see clients presenting with is seeking for the pinnacle moments of one’s life and discounting anything that is perceived less than that. Here’s what I mean: people want to live extraordinary lives and have amazing moments 24/7. They want the peaks without dealing with the troughs. They compare their lives with others and assume if they aren’t doing anything, then others are beating them at whatever it is. It associates with the concept of missing out, otherwise called FOMO. The reality is, people aren’t living their best lives or amazing lives all the time. Sometimes, people are just getting through the day and making the best of what it is. In essence, perhaps what we all need more of (and I’m no exception) is gratitude. Be thankful of all the little things, be thankful of waking up the next morning in your bed, be thankful of having food on the table, of being in good health, of your relationships and family. Nothing is perfect and that’s okay, it shouldn’t have to be. Be happy that you are here in the universe and that each day is a small step towards self-development. 


Oh, another thing. If you want practical skills on how to fight anxiety, depression, trauma, OCD, work and anything that’s affecting you or if you feel like you’re depressed, why not call me for a free phone consultation then if we’re a good fit together, I can assess you and lead you on a road of discovery and healing.


  


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